Spring 2021 Graduate and Professional Studies Catalog 
    
    May 25, 2022  
Spring 2021 Graduate and Professional Studies Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Information


Students may not receive graduate credit for a similarly titled course from an undergraduate program

 

Clinical Counseling

  
  •  

    PSY 6028 - Abuse Assessment and Reporting


    (3)

    Examines legal, ethical, and clinical aspects of child and elder abuse reporting, such as mandatory methods of identifying victims, prevention and intervention, and treatment techniques.  Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    PSY 6029 - Marriage and Family Therapy


    (3)

    This course is an overview of current family systems theories and intervention techniques.  Emphasis is placed on clinical application with case presentations.  Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    PSY 6030 - Treatment of Older Adults


    (3)

    A specialized course for students who wish to work with the rapidly expanding elderly segment of society.  Focus is on the application of assessment and intervention techniques for older adults and their families.  Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    PSY 6033 - Career Development


    (3)

    A close look at career development theory, with emphasis on gender, family, and social/cultural issues that impact career choices.  Techniques and assessment instruments that facilitate lifelong career development will be utilized.  Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    PSY 6045 - Group Counseling


    (3)

    Theories and techniques of group therapy are studied as well as basic and advanced group interventions.  Students learn the stages of group dynamics, the curative factors of group therapy, and various types of group treatment.  Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    PSY 6050 - Psychological Testing and Assessment


    (3)

    This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to administer, score, and interpret several assessment instruments.  Students will be familiar with validity, reliability, and psychometric statistics.  Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    PSY 6058 - Crisis and Trauma Counseling


    (3)

    An investigation into the history and development of crisis intervention and trauma response.  Develops required skills to effectively intervene and assist victims of tragedy or abuse.  Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    PSY 6060 - Human Sexuality


    (3)

    This course is a study of human sexuality and intimacy.  Other areas of emphasis include gender issues, sexual disorders, sexual orientation, and sexual abuse.  Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    PSY 6065 - Psychopharmacology


    (3)

    Examination of commonly prescribed psychopharmacological medications, as well as the identification of their effects and side effects.  Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    PSY 6075 - Treatment of Substance Use Disorders


    (3)

    This course emphasizes evidence-based assessment and intervention skills in the treatment of addictions and compulsive behaviors, as well as co-occurring disorders.   All facets of alcohol and substance abuse/dependency will be examined. Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    PSY 6090 - Research Methodology


    (3)

    This course is an in depth examination of various experimental designs, statistical procedures, conclusions, and limitations of research parameters.  Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and practical applications of research methods of psychotherapy.  Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    PSY 6094 - Pre-Practicum


    (0)

    Prior to practicum assignments in various approved counseling centers, hospitals, clinics, and social service agencies, all students are required to be observed as they counsel at least one client at the onsite counseling center.  Digital recordings of therapy sessions will be utilized to improve therapeutic skills, promote self-awareness, and an understanding of how people change.  Upon approval by the Director of Clinical Training, the student will then enroll in PSY 6095 . Offered summer only. Credit/No Credit.

  
  •  

    PSY 6095 - Supervised Practicum I


    (2)

    Supervised therapy experience in applied psychotherapeutic techniques at an external agency. This course provides support, supervision, and consultation for students’ training at their practicum site. A total of 700 hours, 300 of which are face-to-face direct service, must be accrued throughout the practicum course sequence. Students must be training at an approved site to be enrolled in this course. Credit/No Credit.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 6011 , PSY 6021 , PSY 6025 PSY 6029 PSY 6045 PSY 6094  
  
  •  

    PSY 6096 - Supervised Practicum II


    (2)

    Supervised therapy experience in applied psychotherapeutic techniques at an external agency. This course provides support, supervision, and consultation for students’ training at their practicum site. A total of 700 hours, 300 of which are face-to-face direct service, must be accrued throughout the practicum course sequence. Students must be training at an approved site to be enrolled in this course. Credit/No Credit.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 6095  
  
  •  

    PSY 6097 - Supervised Practicum III


    (2)

    Supervised therapy experience in applied psychotherapeutic techniques at an external agency. This course provides support, supervision, and consultation for students’ training at their practicum site. A total of 700 hours, 300 of which are face-to-face direct service, must be accrued throughout the practicum course sequence. Students must be training at an approved site to be enrolled in this course. Credit/No Credit.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 6096  
  
  •  

    PSY 6098 (A,B,C) - Practicum Extension


    (0)

    Students who complete the three required practicum courses before the end of the program can continue to earn counseling hours toward licensure by staying in practicum status while completing the program. Credit/No Credit.


Computer Information Technology

  
  •  

    CIT 1041 - Intermediate Excel


    (1)

    This course is an independent study, self‐paced, competency based course designed for students who wish to develop a deeper knowledge of MS Excel functionality.   The course will expand upon basic spreadsheet functions  and introduce topics such as cell validation, advanced cell  formatting, conditional functions, goal seek, pivot tables, multi‐sheet functions, and other advanced topics.   Students will complete knowledge assessment through hands‐on simulation labs and online exams.  A faculty advisor provides support and accountability in completing the requirements of the course.  Although the course is self‐paced, a minimum amount of progress must be made each week and all course requirements must be completed within assigned course time.

    Prerequisite(s): A working knowledge of MS Excel that includes the use of cell entry, formatting, and use of common functions.
  
  •  

    CIT 1053 - IT Fundamentals


    (3)

    This course is an independent study, self‐paced, competency based course designed for students who have little to no technical understanding of information technology, yet wish to begin the CIT program.  The course will introduce basic technology topics, such as computer hardware, storage devices, computer peripherals, basic networking, setting up and maintaining a computer, installing and configuring software and basic trouble shooting techniques.  Students will gain practical knowledge of computer concepts through simulation lab activities.  A faculty advisor provides support and accountability in completing the requirements of the course. Although the course is self-paced, a minimum amount of progress must be made each week and all course requirements must be completed within assigned course time. The course aligns with topics covered in CompTIA’s IT Fundamentals certification exam. Taught online.

  
  •  

    CIT 2014 - Introduction to Hardware and Networking


    (4)

    This course is designed to introduce the fundamentals of hardware and networking concepts including hardware components, network protocols, mobile devices and hardware and networking troubleshooting. In addition, students will acquire hands-on experience by working with hardware and networking simulators.  The course aligns with topics covered in CompTIA’s A+ Core 1 certification exam.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 1053  or equivalent academic or work experience.
  
  •  

    CIT 2024 - Introduction to Operating Systems and Security


    (4)

    This course is designed to introduce the fundamentals of operating systems and security concepts including extensive topics in the Windows operating system, other operating systems, system security, software troubleshooting, and operational procedures. In addition, students will acquire hands-on experience by working with networking and security simulators.  The course aligns with topics covered in CompTIA’s A+ Core 2 certification exam.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 1053  or equivalent academic or work experience.
  
  •  

    CIT 2061 - IT Fundamentals Exam Prep 


    (1)

    This course is an independent study, self‐paced, competency based course designed for students who wish to prepare for the CompTIA’s IT Fundamentals certification exam. The course is intended for students who have already completed the CIT 1053  course or have equivalent academic or work experience.  Students will be required to complete a predetermined number of practice certification exams, assess knowledge domain deficiencies, and focus on acquiring the requisite knowledge to pass the certification exam. A faculty advisor provides support and accountability in completing the requirements of the course.  Although the course is self‐paced, a minimum amount of progress must be made each week and all course requirements must be completed within the assigned course time.  Attempting the certification exam within the assigned course time is also required.  Although passing the certification exam is not required to pass this course, the results of the certification exam will be used to determine the final grade in the course.  Students already holding a current certification for this course are not eligible to take this course.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 1053  or equivalent academic or work experience.
  
  •  

    CIT 3011 - A+ Exam Prep


    (1)

    This course is an independent study, self‐paced, competency based course designed for students who wish to prepare for the CompTIA’s A+ certification exams (Core 1 and Core 2). The course is intended for students who have already completed the CIT 2014  and CIT 2024  courses.  Students will be required to complete a predetermined number of practice certification exams, assess knowledge domain deficiencies, and focus on acquiring the requisite knowledge domains to pass the certification exams. A faculty advisor provides support and accountability in completing the requirements of the course.  Although the course is self‐paced, a minimum amount of progress must be made each week and all course requirements must be completed within the assigned course time.  Attempting the certification exams within the assigned course time is also required.  Although passing the certification exams are not required to pass this course, the results of the certification exams will be used to determine the final grade in the course.  Students already holding a current certification for this course are not eligible to take this course.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 2014  and CIT 2024  
  
  •  

    CIT 3014 - Networking


    (4)

    This course is designed to provide an in‐depth understanding to a wide range of network architectures and configuration options. The course explores the concepts of physical and virtual network design options and network administration requirements. The course will cover the topics of wired and wireless networking, network optimization and management, virtual local area networks, network types, network hardware and software and networking standards. In addition, students will acquire hands‐on experience by working with networking and security simulators.  This course aligns with topics covered in the CompTIA’s Network+ certification exam.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 2014  
  
  •  

    CIT 3021 - Network+ Exam Prep


    (1)

    This course is an independent study, self‐paced, competency based course designed for students who wish to prepare for the CompTIA’s Network+ certification exam.  The course is intended for students who have already completed the CIT 3014  course.  Students will be required to complete a predetermined number of practice certification exams, assess knowledge domain deficiencies, and focus on acquiring the requisite knowledge domains to pass the certification exams. A faculty advisor provides support and accountability in completing the requirements of the course.  Although the course is self‐paced, a minimum amount of progress must be made each week and all course requirements must be completed within the assigned course time.  Attempting the certification exam within the assigned course time is also required.  Although passing the certification exam is not required to pass this course, the results of the certification exams will be used to determine the final grade in the course.  Students already holding a current certification for this course are not eligible to take this course.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 3014  
  
  •  

    CIT 3024 - Security and Information Assurance


    (4)

    This course is designed to provide an in‐depth understanding to the concepts of data and network security. Other topics include access control, authentication, authorization, data security and integrity, encryption, recovery, and business continuity. Students will gain hands‐on experience with firewalls, network security, application security, email security, and tools for securing, monitoring and auditing the IT network and systems environments through system security simulators. This course aligns with topics covered in the CompTIA’s Security+ certification exam.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 2024  
  
  •  

    CIT 3031 - Security+ Exam Prep


    (1)

    This course is an independent study, self‐paced, competency based course designed for students who wish to prepare for the CompTIA’s Security+ certification exam.   The course is intended for students who have already completed the CIT 3024  course.  Students will be required to complete a predetermined number of practice certification exams, assess knowledge domain deficiencies, and focus on acquiring the requisite knowledge domains to pass the certification exams. A faculty advisor provides support and accountability in completing the requirements of the course.  Although the course is self‐paced, a minimum amount of progress must be made each week and all course requirements must be completed within the assigned course time.  Attempting the certification exam within the assigned course time is also required.  Although passing the certification exam is not required to pass this course, the results of the certification exams will be used to determine the final grade in the course.  Students already holding a current certification for this course are not eligible to take this course.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 3024  or equivalent academic or work experience.
  
  •  

    CIT 3034 - Project Management


    (4)

    This course is designed to provide the fundamentals of project management with an emphasis on managing unique challenges of information technology (IT) projects.  Students will be introduced to the IT project management process using industry accepted methodologies. Extensive  case related work will be used to help students  understand the important aspects of time, performance,  cost, and risk estimation in relation to the unique conditions often present in IT projects. Each of the critical phases of the IT project management process will be reviewed in detail using practical examples from the IT industry. Students are also introduced to computer‐based project management software such as MS Project.  This course aligns with topics covered in the CompTIA’s Project+ certification exam and the PMI’s CAPM certification exam.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 2014   and CIT 2024  
  
  •  

    CIT 3041 - Project+ Exam Prep


    (1)

    This course is an independent study, self‐paced, competency based course designed for students who wish to prepare for the CompTIA’s Project+ certification exam.   The course is intended for students who have already completed the CIT 3034  course.   Students will be required to complete a predetermined number of practice certification exams, assess knowledge domain deficiencies, and focus on acquiring the requisite knowledge domains to pass the certification exams. A faculty advisor provides support and accountability in completing the requirements of the course.  Although the course is self‐paced, a minimum amount of progress must be made each week and all course requirements must be completed within the assigned course time.  Attempting the certification exam within the assigned course time is also required.  Although passing the certification exam is not required to pass this course, the results of the certification exams will be used to determine the final grade in the course.  Students already holding a current certification for this course are not eligible to take this course.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 3034  or equivalent academic or work experience.
  
  •  

    CIT 3054 - Database Design 


    (4)

    This course is designed to provide an in‐depth, hands‐on introduction to designing and implementing databases that use relational technologies with a significant market presence. Hands‐on assignments using an industry standard DBMS, such as MS SQL, MySQL, or Oracle Server will receive significant coverage in the course. SQL and various vendor extensions to the language will be covered. In addition, some advanced topics such as stored procedures and triggers will be covered.

    Prerequisite(s):  CIT 2014  and CIT 2024  
  
  •  

    CIT 3064 - Web Design and Scripting


    (4)

    This course is designed to provide in-depth, hands-on instruction in designing and scripting Web sites using HTML5 and CSS3 standards. Techniques in page layout and graphic design will be introduced.  Assignments will focus on hands-on use of modern web development practices using integrated development environments.  In addition, the course will introduce popular website development and content management tools such as WordPress to show alternative development approaches to HTML5 and CCS3. Letter Grade

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 1053  or equivalent academic or work experience.
  
  •  

    CIT 3074 - Cloud Computing


    (4)

    This course is designed to provide students an in-depth introduction to cloud computing. The course introduces the concepts of cloud configuration and deployment, security, maintenance, management, and troubleshooting. Hands-on labs with cloud technologies such as Microsoft Azure and AWS will give students practical experience working with cloud technologies. This course aligns with topics covered in the CompTIA’s Cloud+ certification exam.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 3011  or equivalent academic or work experience.
  
  •  

    CIT 3081 - Cloud+ Exam Prep


    (1)

    This course is an independent study, self-paced, competency based course designed for students who wish to prepare for the CompTIA’s Cloud+ certification exam. The course is intended for students who have already completed the CIT 3074  course. Students will be required to complete a predetermined number of practice certification exams, assess knowledge domain deficiencies, and focus on acquiring the requisite knowledge domains to pass the certification exams. A faculty advisor provides support and accountability in completing the requirements of the course. Although the course is self-paced, a minimum amount of progress must be made each week and all course requirements must be completed within the assigned course time. Attempting the certification exam within the assigned course time is also required. Although passing the certification exam is not required to pass this course, the results of the certification exams will be used to determine the final grade in the course. Students already holding a current certification for this course are not eligible to take this course.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 3074  or equivalent academic or work experience.
  
  •  

    CIT 4014 - Web Programming


    (4)

    This course is designed to provide a practical approach to web development using either server side or client side scripting languages, such as PHP, ASP or JavaScript. This course teaches the core language and implementation of webpage based scripting. Students will learn the web programming language and practices through many hands‐on assignments in developing web based applications. The integration of databases, such as MySQL or MS SQL will provide additional depth of knowledge.  In addition the course will introduce other forms of modern web based protocols, such as XML, JSON and SOAP.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 3054  
  
  •  

    CIT 4024 - Visual Programming


    (4)

    This course is designed to provide a practical approach to event based visual programming using modern‐general purpose programming languages, such as C#, Java, Python or Visual Basic. This course teaches the core concepts of programming, such as proper variable usage, decision structures, iterative structures, common data structures, and proper programming logic. Students will learn the programming language through many hands‐on assignments in developing event based and visual computer applications. The integration of databases, such as MySQL or MS SQL will provide additional depth of knowledge.  In addition the course will introduce object oriented programming techniques and the use of complex data structures.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 3054  
  
  •  

    CIT 4034 - Management of Information Systems 


    (4)

    This course is designed to provide in‐depth review of modern information systems management strategies and approaches.  Topics in the course include management of operational strategy, server and network management practices, data reporting systems, social media management, business and IT strategic alignment, and disaster recovery.  A review of incident cases will provide students with an understanding of how the course concepts can be applied in real world situations.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 2014  and CIT 2024  
  
  •  

    CIT 4062 - Topics in Cyber Security


    (2)

    This course is designed to build on the previous computer science and cyber security classes. The course will focus on applications of cyber security programs and process via case studies and research projects.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 3014  or equivalent, and CIT 3024  or equivalent, and consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    CIT 4071 - Information Technology Practicum 


    (1‐4)

    This course is a supervised experience in which the student works with industry professionals to gain experience with managing information systems. The course may be taken for 1 to 4 units based on the number of engagement hours in the practicum. This course may be repeated to a total of four units. Credit/No Credit

    Prerequisite(s): Student has completed at least 16 credit hours in CIT course or related academic field and permission from the faculty advisor.
  
  •  

    CIT 4081 - Information Technology Project 


    (1)

    This course is a study of a selected problem or topic in Information Technology under the direction of a faculty advisor. The faculty advisor and student propose the research topic and course deliverables. Approval by the program director or department chair is required. May be repeated for up to two units. Credit/No Credit

    Prerequisite(s): Student has completed at least 16 credit hours in CIT courses or related academic field and has permission from the faculty advisor.

Criminal Justice

  
  •  

    SCJ 3000 - Justice In a Complex Society


    (4)

    An introduction to and comparative examination of the components of the justice process dealing with delinquent and criminal behavior. Examines criminally deviant behavior in a complex society.

     

  
  •  

    SCJ 3010 - Criminology and Community Policing


    (4)

    The study of crime and criminal behavior, the role of law, efforts at prevention and control.

    Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Sociology or equivalent.
  
  •  

    SCJ 3050 (A,B,C,D) - Writing and Interviewing in the Criminal Justice Profession


    (1) unit per semester for a total of (4) units

    A series of four one-unit skills course segments designed to develop essential skills and competencies required for daily performance of duties in various criminal justice careers.  Incorporates basic concepts for collecting and documenting evidence and procedures.  A series of competency based-courses for report writing, interviewing, and communication skills.

    •   SCJ3050A focus is writing.
    •   SCJ3050B focus is evidentiary and motivational interviewing.
    •   SCJ3050C focus is internal communication.
    •   SCJ3050D focus is communication and interaction with media, courts, and community.


  
  •  

    SCJ 3095 - Research Methods for Criminal Justice


    (4)

    Introduces major concepts of social research, provides skills to understand research results; awareness of influence of social and legal parameters of ethical research; opportunity to do analysis and apply research in the criminal justice arenas, identify research strategies to promote social/economic justice.  Helps prepare students for capstone course.

    Prerequisite(s): Statistics
  
  •  

    SCJ 4009 - Criminal Law


    (4)

    Foundations for understanding the historical development, philosophy of law and constitutional provisions, social forces and application to the administration of justice; study of events and trends relating to law.  Explore underlying theoretical issues and examine crimes against persons, habitation, property and public order, and morals.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    SCJ 4010 - Constitutional Foundations


    (4)

    Examination of the federal constitutional provisions which impact the criminal justice system with an emphasis on the amendments in the Bill of Rights and law enforcement; the rights to due process and the assistance of counsel; penalties and constraints on the correctional system and the influences of a broader society.

  
  •  

    SCJ 4050 - Restorative Justice


    (4)

    This course will provide a critical introduction to the fundamental principles and practices of restorative justice.  The course explores the needs and roles of key “stakeholders’ (victims, offenders, communities, justice systems), outlines the basic principles and values of restorative justice, and introduces some of the primary models of practice.  It also addresses challenges to restorative justice - the dangers, the pitfalls - as well as possible strategies to help prevent restorative justice and victimology from theoretical, demographic, legal, and faith perspectives.  The course builds an understanding of the relationships between restorative justice and victims, offenders, the criminal justice system.  The emotional effects of crime and reconciliation will also be examined. 

     

    Prerequisite(s): Social Problems or equivalent course, or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    SCJ 4072 - Internship in Criminal Justice


    (2)

    The field experience provides students the opportunity to increase their professional competence through direct, supervised practice experiences in the community setting. As part of the capstone experience, it is a time of integration, of learning about the commonality of practice in spite of the diversity of settings. SCJ4072 is to be completed concurrently with SCJ 4076  Seminar as a capstone experience of application and professional integration.

    Concurrent: SCJ 4076  
  
  •  

    SCJ 4076 - Seminar for Criminal Justice


    (2)

    As part of a capstone experience, this course draws on material learned in other courses, provides opportunity t0 integrate academic learning with personal and professional internship experiences. To be completed concurrently with 2-unit SCJ 4072  Internship.

    Concurrent: SCJ 4072  
  
  •  

    SCL 3000 - Career Development


    (1)

    This course explores how to reflect on personality preferences, interests, and values to intentionally pursue a fulfilling career. Students will engage in industry research to explore different fields of interest and set professional goals. Students will be provided with an opportunity to build strategic marketing tools and begin networking for greater job search and career success.


General Biology

  
  •  

    BIO 6001 - Graduate Internship in Biology


    (1-6)

    This course is an elective option allowing students to gain research/lab experience through internships at a variety of local businesses/organizations. The course may be repeated up to a total of six units. Credit/No Credit

  
  •  

    BIO 6011 - Learning in Science


    (3)

    This course involves discussion and integration of seminal papers in the area of learning theory, with applications in a variety of scientific research, business, and educational settings. Predominantly on-line course delivery.

  
  •  

    BIO 6021 - Readings in Biology


    (1)

    This course focuses on the reading and discussion of research articles and other sources of material on a particular topic in biology.  Topics vary. May be repeated up to 4 units. The repeated offering must cover different content. Credit/No Credit

  
  •  

    BIO 6033 - History/Philosophy of Science


    (3)

    This course involves discussion of seminal works in the history and philosophy of science as a way of thinking. From this perspective, the course explores current interest in the nature of science as an integral part of the study of science. Predominantly on-line course delivery.

  
  •  

    BIO 6043 - Research Design in Science Education


    (3)

    This course promotes understanding of both qualitative and quantitative research design in science education, with a focus on current trends in the field. Predominantly on-line course delivery.

  
  •  

    BIO 6060 - Microbiology and Immunology


    (3)

    Concepts in microbiology, including the diversity and ecology of microscopic organisms, and in immunology, focusing on cellular and molecular regulation of the immune system in health and disease, are addressed from the perspective of teaching for conceptual understanding. Lecture and lab.

  
  •  

    BIO 6061 - Ecology of Plants and Animals


    (3)

    Concepts related to complex ecological systems with special emphasis on the interactions between plants and animals are addressed from the perspective of teaching for conceptual understanding. Lecture and field-oriented lab.

  
  •  

    BIO 6062 - Genetics and Molecular Biology


    (3)

    Concepts in genetics and molecular biology, including inheritance, organization, variability and expression of genes, with emphasis on the regulatory mechanisms that govern gene expression in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, are addressed from the perspective of teaching for conceptual understanding. Lecture and lab.

  
  •  

    BIO 6063 - Cell Biology


    (3)

    Concepts in cell biology, including the chemical basis of life, the structure and function of organelles, basic metabolic pathways, models for the origin of cells are addressed from the perspective of teaching for conceptual understanding. Lecture and lab.

  
  •  

    BIO 6064 - Developmental Biology


    (3)

    Concepts emerging from the union of the two disciplines of evolution and development that help us better understand both the process of development and of the diversity of life forms are central to this course. Emphasis will be placed on the concepts of modularity, developmental master control genes (toolkit genes) and genetic switches that are the keys to explaining how the diversity within the body plans of animals develop. These topics will be addressed from the perspective of teaching for conceptual understanding. Lecture and lab.

  
  •  

    BIO 6065 - Physiology of Plants and Animals


    (3)

    Concepts related to the physiological mechanisms that contribute to homeostasis in both plants and animals are addressed from the perspective of teaching for conceptual understanding. Lecture and lab.

  
  •  

    BIO 6067 - Marine Biology


    (3)

    Concepts in marine biology, including the ecology, function, and adaptations of marine organisms, are addressed from the perspective of teaching for conceptual understanding.  Lecture and field-oriented lab.

  
  •  

    BIO 6068 - Evolutionary Biology


    (3)

    The concept of evolution is viewed as the central theme unifying all of biology.  In this course evolutionary processes will be discussed in their genetic, historical, religious, and ecological contexts.  Topics covered include the agents of evolution, speciation, population genetics, and macroevolutionary trends in evolution.  These topics will be addressed from the perspective of teaching for conceptual understanding.  Lecture and lab.

  
  •  

    BIO 6082 - Research Proposal and Pilot Study


    (1)

    Students identify a biology or biology education-related research problem, then prepare a brief literature review and research design, followed by carrying out a pilot study with abbreviated analysis. Predominantly on-line course delivery.

  
  •  

    BIO 6083 (A,B,C,D,E,F) - Thesis


    (1-6)

    Students write a thorough literature review and bibliography related to their chosen biology education problem, then design, carry out, and analyze the results of their original research, draw conclusions, and propose implications of their findings. This process culminates with the completion of the student’s written thesis, as well as a public presentation of the research. Students register for each thesis unit (6083 A through F) in sequence (A through F) corresponding to the 6 units necessary to complete the thesis requirement. Students may register for as many as three thesis units in a single semester (i.e., 6083A, 6083B, and 6083C) or as few as one unit. At the end of each semester a grade of Credit/No Credit is issued reflecting the student’s satisfactory progress toward thesis completion. If in the final semester (BIO 6083F) of thesis enrollment the student has not completed all requirements for the thesis, the student is automatically enrolled in thesis extension status for each subsequent semester until the thesis is completed. Credit/No Credit. A thesis extension fee is charged (see fee schedule) for each semester of thesis extension.

  
  •  

    BIO 6084 - Comprehensive Examination in General Biology


    (0)

    This exam is required for general biology students to complete their graduation requirements if the thesis option is not chosen. Credit/No Credit.

  
  •  

    BIO 6090 - Special Studies in Biology


    (1-3)

    Selected studies in the area of biology as determined by the Department of Biology. Permission is required from the Chair of the Department of Biology and the course faculty. The student must be in good academic standing. Students may repeat the course for credit up to a maximum of eight (8) units. The repeated offering must cover different content.

  
  •  

    BIO 6092 - Perspectives on Science


    (1)

    Perspectives on Science is a monthly seminar series with speakers from research institutions and universities which address current research in their fields, including chemistry, biology, physics, astronomy, and geology.  Following the seminar, students discuss research articles by the speaker. May be repeated for a total of six (6) units. Credit/No Credit.

  
  •  

    BIO 6123 - Leadership in Science


    (3)

    This course explores the development of a theoretical basis of the intrinsic and extrinsic motivations for exceptional performance. Students analyze the ways leadership and culture shape an organization’s environment and history. Different leadership styles, personal leadership effectiveness, and both historical and contemporary leadership literature will be examined. Case studies relevant to academic biology departments, life science research labs, biotechnology companies, and biology-related non-profit organizations will be included.

  
  •  

    BIO 6163 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Science


    (3)

    This methodology course is designed to prepare students to teach secondary-level (Grades 7-12) and college-level science. This course includes lesson planning, intentional practice of classroom management, micro-teaching, classroom observation, group and self-evaluation, active and equitable participation for culturally, ethnically, linguistically, and academically diverse learners, and formative assessment to differentiate instruction for all learners. Topics include the following: pedagogical content knowledge, curriculum selection and design, methods and modalities of science teaching, assessment, classroom application of various forms of technology, safe laboratory management and operation, integration of language arts and mathematics in the science curriculum, and professional organizations. Instruction is aligned to the state-adopted Science Common Core Standards (7-12) and the Next Generation English Language Development Standards, and relevance to college course teaching is incorporated. Modifications for diverse learners and learners with exceptionalities are researched. [AC1] Equivalent to EDU 4034 (undergraduate level) or EDU6024 (graduate level). PLNU students who complete BIO4063 are exempt from taking EDU 4034 or EDU6024 for their preliminary single subject credential. Undergraduate students that are eligible may take this course as BIO 4063. Students with credit for BIO4063 or EDU4034 or EDU6024 are not eligible for this course.


General Education for Adult Degree Completion Programs

  
  •  

    BST 1001 - Old Testament History and Religion


    (2)

    Within the context of the history of Israel, an overview of the literature of the Old Testament with special attention to its literary history and theological themes. Online.

  
  •  

    BST 1002 - New Testament History and Religion


    (3)

    Within the context of Christian origins, an overview of the canonical literature of the New Testament with special attention to its literary history and theological themes. Online.

  
  •  

    CEL 2030 - Personal and Consumer Financial Management


    (3)

    Relationship of values, standards, and goals to the allocation of resources and the personal and consumer decision-making process. Emphasis is placed on the standards for selection of consumer goods, protection of the consumer, and conditions which influence individual and family management. Online. Offered every semester.

  
  •  

    CEL 3015 - Health and Well-Being


    (3)

    An introductory course designed to provide students with a broad spectrum of applicable information intended to promote a healthy lifestyle. A holistic approach is used that encompasses the physical, mental, emotional, relational, spiritual, and environmental aspects of wellness. Online. Not repeatable. Offered every semester.

  
  •  

    ETH 4011 - Organizational Ethics


    (2)

    This course provides an introduction to foundational theories and problems in moral philosophy and explores a process for ethical decision making in order to develop a stakeholder approach to leadership in organizations. Emphasis will be given to the study of major Western ethical theories and important moral philosophers, and to creating a framework for evaluating ethical choices and applying that framework to ethical dilemmas in organizations.
      Course was approved by GESC committee in Spring 2021 for use during the Summer 2021 term.

  
  •  

    HUM 1000 - Literature and Culture


    (2)

    A study of representative works of literature and cultural contexts. Online.

  
  •  

    HUM 3052 - Diverse Voices in American Culture


    (3)

    An advanced study of selected works written by Americans who have lived on and written from the margins of American society. Online.

  
  •  

    SCL 1001 - Introduction to Sociology


    (3)

    An introduction to sociology, basic concepts, theories, development as a discipline, and the tools of social investigation. Online.


Kinesiology

  
  •  

    KIN 6000 - Foundations in Kinesiology


    (3)

    This course provides an overview of the theory and applications in Kinesiology with specific emphasis on the exercise and sport sciences.  Leadership, professionalism, and engagement in these disciplines from a Christian approach will be emphasized.  Students will engage with the concept of incorporating exercise as preventive medicine.  The course will also include an exploration and overview of laboratory procedures in each discipline and facilities tour (i.e. EMG, ultrasound, metabolic cart, movement screening, exercise testing).  Students will formulate an initial research or capstone project idea as part of the MS degree, interfacing with program faculty and the university library to initially form and develop their research question or capstone project.

  
  •  

    KIN 6005 - Research Methods


    (3)

    This course is an introduction to research methods to acquaint the student with analyzing the professional literature. The course will explore both quantitative and qualitative research methods, including descriptive and inferential statistics.  Topics will include: 1) selected techniques and designs used in research, with special emphasis given to planning, conducting, and reporting of research; and 2) applied statistical analysis and interpretation of data from the field of exercise and sport science. Students will produce an original pilot research project proposal including preliminary statistical design. 

    *Students in the Sport Management concentration may substitute a BUS course for this core requirement (up to 6 units total may be substituted).

  
  •  

    KIN 6007 - Evidence-Based Practice and Research Methods


    (3)

    This course provides an introduction to research methods, including exploring quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods approaches, to acquaint students with analyzing the professional literature. Students will practice the judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients and clients, as well as the development and delivery of integrative health programs and services. Students will learn to: ask a focused question to satisfy the health and wellness needs of a specific patient or client demographic; find the best evidence by searching the literature; critically appraise the literature; apply the results in professional practice; and evaluate the outcomes.

  
  •  

    KIN 6010 - Evidence-Based Practice and Decision Making in Kinesiology


    (3)

    This course will enable students to practice the judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients and clients. Students will learn to integrate the best external evidence with their clinical expertise and patient concerns to: ask a focused question to satisfy the health needs of a specific patient; find the best evidence by searching the literature; critically appraise the literature; apply the results in clinical practice; and evaluate the outcomes in patients. This course is offered online.

  
  •  

    KIN 6011 - Managing Personnel, Facilities, and Events in Sports


    (3)

    This course will prepare sport professionals to plan athletic and fitness events, manage the personnel and facilities associated with these events and facilities, and design effective fitness and exercise programming. Students will be exposed to industry leading sport and fitness facilities and trends throughout the southern California region through periodical visits to these facilities.  Contemporary issues in entrepreneurship in the sport and fitness industries will be addressed.

  
  •  

    KIN 6015 - Biomechanical and Neurological Basis of Human Movement


    (3)

    Students will explore advanced concepts in biomechanics and motor control (neuromechanics). Topics will include muscle/tendon function and architecture, motion analysis, sensorimotor system architecture, reflex pathways and excitability, and postural control. A combination of lectures, group work, demonstrations, laboratory experiences and prescribed readings will be used within the course.

     

  
  •  

    KIN 6017 - Lifestyle Medicine and Integrative Health


    (3)

    This course provides an overview of paradigm shifts in the field of healthcare, highlighting an increasingly integrative approach to medicine centered on treating the whole person- body, mind and spirit. Students will explore evidence-informed conventional, complementary and alternative approaches to health care, and examine lifestyle interventions in areas such as stress management, nutrition, sleep hygiene and physical activity in order to provide a multidimensional approach to optimal health and well-being.

  
  •  

    KIN 6020 - Marketing, Promotion and Public Relations in Sport


    (3)

    Students will explore and develop promotional and marketing strategies involved in the spectrum of the sport and fitness industries. Students will be equipped for the high school, collegiate and professional sport settings as well as personal, group, and comprehensive fitness facilities that promote a holistic approach to wellness.

     

  
  •  

    KIN 6025 - Special Topics in Exercise and Sports Science


    (3)

    The topics of this course will alternate based on faculty expertise and student interest. Each topic will provide students with a unique opportunity to gain certification or advanced specialization in an area of their choosing. Topics may include: Applied Function and Corrective Exercise; Exercise as Preventive Medicine; Movement Interventions for Aging, Disease Prevention and Health promotion;  and Electrocardiography and Interpretation.

     

  
  •  

    KIN 6026 - Sport and Exercise Nutrition for Peak Performance


    (3)

    Students in the fitness and sport performance professions will learn the science of nutrition, including cellular biology, digestion, and metabolism of macronutrients and micronutrients, as well as the practical applications of coaching individual clients in nutrition to enhance performance.

     

  
  •  

    KIN 6027 - Behavior Change Models, Methods and Theories


    (3)

    This course examines widely accepted theories, models and methods for facilitating health behavior change. Topics include, but are not limited to, the transtheoretical model of behavioral change, self-determination theory, positive psychology, and motivational interviewing.

  
  •  

    KIN 6030 - Leadership in Sports


    (3)

    Both historical and contemporary aspects of leadership theory will be applied to various aspects of the sport industry, including post-secondary education, athletics administration, and the rapidly-growing business of sport.

  
  •  

    KIN 6035 - Advanced Practice in Movement Interventions and Corrective Exercise


    (3)

    This course will provide the fitness professional with in-depth expertise in various movement interventions to improve function, eliminate pain and enhance performance. Emphasis will be placed on designing individualized strength training and corrective exercise programs, and utilizing movement screening during functional interventions.

  
  •  

    KIN 6036 - Clinical Exercise Testing and Interpretation


    (3)

    This course emphasizes advanced study of the theoretical basis for exercise testing and practical procedures involved with pre-exercise screening and exercise testing. The course prepares students to utilize scientific rationale to design, implement and supervise exercise programming for those with chronic diseases, conditions and/or physical dysfunctions beyond cardiovascular and pulmonary disease.  Students will interpret information from screening and will apply this to appropriate exercise intervention protocols. Students will be prepared to pursue certification as an ACSM Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist.  Note: 600 hours of preceptor-supervised clinical experience are also required for ACSM certification.

  
  •  

    KIN 6037 - Exercise and Nutrition for Health and Healing


    (3)

    This course evaluates the critical role that physical activity, exercise, and nutrition play in preventing and treating chronic diseases. Students will examine current research, established guidelines and best practices in order to design and deliver comprehensive lifestyle interventions that optimize health, healing, and well-being.

  
  •  

    KIN 6038 - Clinical Exercise Physiology


    (3)

    This course provides a detailed analysis of the effects of exercise on the organ systems of the body.  Lecture and laboratory experiences will be related to apparently healthy populations as well as those with obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Letter Grade.

  
  •  

    KIN 6040 - Finance and Economics of Sports


    (3)

    This course will provide students with an introduction and relevant application of the economic principles that influence athletic, sport and fitness organizations. Students will discuss and implement budgeting, financial statements, economic impact analysis and other related topics.

     

  
  •  

    KIN 6045 - Loaded Movement Training


    (3)

    This course explores the methodology of Loaded Movement Training (LMT).  Students will explore how the body adapts to LMT from a neuro, mechanical, and metabolic perspective and justify the use of LMT in an exercise program.  Students will gain knowledge on how to design exercise workouts and programs using Loaded Movement Training for Sport Performance.

  
  •  

    KIN 6046 - Clinical Exercise Physiology and Metabolism


    (3)

    This course provides an advanced understanding of the clinical effects and physiologic adaptations of the human body to exercise interventions.  The effects of exercise on the organ systems of the body will be explored through lecture and laboratory experiences with an emphasis toward combating obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.  The clinical application of current research will occur in lab settings. 

  
  •  

    KIN 6047 - Integrative Health and Wellness Coaching


    (3)

    In this course, students will apply evidence-based behavior change strategies and effective communication techniques to facilitate client-centered coaching interventions. Emphasis will be placed on the development and refinement of practical coaching skills in order to empower clients to make meaningful and sustainable lifestyle changes. This course will also survey the current landscape and future opportunities within the evolving field of health and wellness coaching in order to prepare students for work in a variety of settings.

  
  •  

    KIN 6050 - Research Project Seminar in Kinesiology


    (2)

    This course provides students with guidance in the research process to deepen knowledge in an area of their professional interest.  Students will complete and present an original research project including preliminary statistical design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of results.

  
  •  

    KIN 6051 - Seminar in Kinesiology


    (2)

    This course will engage students in relevant Kinesiology issues in order to solve current problems and lead future initiatives. Industry experts will be invited to present on a broad range of topics including sport and fitness entrepreneurship, faithful leadership, media and public relations, sport and fitness technology, corporate wellness, behavior change and other topics of interest to students.

  
  •  

    KIN 6056 - Clinical Exercise Prescription


    (3)

    This course prepares students to utilize scientific rationale to design, implement and supervise exercise programming for patients with chronic diseases, conditions and/or physical dysfunctions of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, and immunologic systems.  Students will be prepared to pursue certification as an ACSM Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist. Note: 600 hours of preceptor-supervised clinical experience are also required for ACSM certification.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 6036  or consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    KIN 6057 - Wellness Entrepreneurship


    (3)

    This course provides health and wellness professionals with a practical framework for entrepreneurship, emphasizing key principles for business success. Students will develop and apply entrepreneurial knowledge and skills necessary to make informed professional decisions regarding starting a new entrepreneurial opportunity, joining an entrepreneurial endeavor, acquiring an established business or creating a new venture within an existing organization.

 

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